Itshitshi

Itshitshi is a brave interrogation of muti killings in our society. Above all else it is also a reflection on the nature of greed prevalent in us with regards to being successful as a people at any cost, let alone running businesses. It is an exquisitely made film with a balanced palette for its production design that does justice to the script it rests on. Nhlakanipho Mapumulo will win your heart as an animatedly soft empathetic Njomane and both Dawn Thandeka King and Nomsa Bthelezi respectively hold their positions as great talent this country has ever ushered to our screens. Yes you guessed it right I loved this film

Τhere are works of art that braves to tackle contemporary issues with verve and hold water while doing so and there are those that do exactly that within the confines of a small canvas scale, as far as cinematographic time accorded them is concerned, and manage to just get it perfect, leaving no loose ends and nuancing the demise or triumphs of the human spirit for us to think about. Thapelo Motloung’s Itshitshi (2017) fits snugly into the second paradigm

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Film Review: Elinye Ithuba

Elinye Ithuba is one of those works that interrogates the effects of our sacrifices and the fact that to undo the deeds that might have gotten us in trouble the first time around we might just have to pay a heavy price

♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  /  –

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Τhere is a moment in Elinye Ithuba wherein Dumisani (Blondie Makhene) and Hlengiwe (Slindile Nodangala)are reminiscing about the past and laments the time that Dumisani missed while he was in jail and music is playing in the background. Jovially he asks her who is the musician playing this good music and Hlengiwe responds that it is Blondie, surprisingly Dumisani exclaims that who would’ve thought that Blondie would still be singing after all these years

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Film Review: The Ring

The Ring attempts to be funny while it deals with the overcooked classic tale of love. Is there anything to say in this theme? Not really, except for the reshuffle of the sign system and point of view vis-à-vis perspective. Despite a few strong points here and there this film has its moments but offers us nothing new. It whispers to us a feather light 2deF’Points out of Five: ♦ ♦ /¶

image source: http://rndcdn.dstv.com/dstvcms/2015/12/08/ring.jpg
image source: http://rndcdn.dstv.com/dstvcms/2015/12/08/ring.jpg

There are works that simply repeat what we have seen before by just changing the context within which their narratives are rooted and then push the narratives towards us. One, supposedly a discerning viewer, can forgive such narratives for their repetitive swing if they are adorned with strong points in their construction. If the work is revisionist in its take of the subject matter concerned then the discerning viewer is in for a treat. If there is a lack in this regard but the work makes up for it in its actors performances or its production design which may represent a strong center point in the delivery of the narrative, the viewer – discerning or lay, may be forgiving as far as the failure of the work to advance story telling is concerned. The Ring, which falls in the latter spectrum is rescued by an ensemble of its actors as it tries to impress

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Film Review: Ilizwi

Ilizwi is a proposal that hints at what we could see in the future in terms of the bourgeoning South African film industry once the M-Net in Motion Academy 2015 Interns are striking it out on their own and are brave enough to venture outside of the box. The film initiates a new paranormal tale with a slight thrill build up and delivers to us a gentle 3deF’Points out of Five: ♦ ♦ ♦ /¶

♦  ♦  ♦  / – –

Ilizwi
Image Source:  https://pbs.twing.com/media/CVxVrIZU8AAoQqY.png

The story of paranormal activity with a twist of traditional African beliefs has been told before. In any case it would seem quite weird but not impossible for a protagonist to be inserted in a story set in South Africa wherein they are mysteriously blessed with telepathic prowess without attributing their power to some ancestral lineage. Imagine if there was such a film? Contextually speaking the creatives involved will have to push the imaginary envelope where no one has gone before. That place does exist. It is outside of the box

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Film Review: Sugar & Spice

Sugar & Spice attempts to tackle the vulnerability of young girls at the hands of grown up men who uses them for their ego boosting, unfortunately in a span of about sixty minutes the film fails to tighten up its narration at a crucial moment in the narrative discourse – and its closure feels hurried. And that, only that, with regard to Sugar & Spice undo the rather relevant theme the work erects and runs the work into failure to impress the discerning viewer. It sustains an ‘ok’ three dEF’Points out of five.

(♦♦♦−−)

{f} there is anything that can disappoint one with films is when a film ends and you as the viewer feel it did not give its all, when it feels short or even hurried. When you feel there are a lot of knots left undone. A sort of uncrossed t’s that begs crossing. If a film is minimal as a work of art it should established such an idea right at the opening scenes. Its detail to economy will demand that it is judged on that merit. However even such work will wrestle with its closing final scenes if it is to be accomplished by way of its consistency in order for us to regard it as a finished piece albeit minimal. Sugar & Spice leaves us with a bitter sweet taste because it fails to round of its rich discourse, instead, it erects questions right about the end of its crux narrative and that is its only flaw.

Mzansi Bioskop

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