Hindsight: Language is our present frontier

HISTORY»During a mellow debate which took global center stage on the minds of fans of double O’ seven which toyed with the question as to who should portray Mr. James Bond when Daniel Craig steps away from the role of the British spy a lot of commentators both abroad and home exclaimed that it was about time the franchise transformed. A univocal sentiment was bellowed: it was about time someone in the caliber of Will Smith or Idris Alba took the role in a bid to show that the franchise had entered the 21st century; that it, the franchise, was mindful of our global community (with Smith in mind this will be rather on the extreme, but why not? After all writers are versatile in spinning myths in any direction they so desire). I don’t know what flared up this explosive thinking that gripped at the British psyche as far as its gift to the world is concerned but unlike you I suspect that it was the casting of Naomi Harris as Miss Moneypenny that caused paradigmatic anomaly within the grand narrative of the famous British Spy syntactic construction thus making the latter thinking possible. May I hazard to say it is only a matter of time that the unfathomable happen. Perhaps in our lifetime. It as if someone let the door ajar to invite fantastic ideas inside.  

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dEF’Rating: Lucky

Sihle Dlamini as (Lucky) and Jayashree Basavaraj as Padma in Luky (2012). Image source: http://cdn.24.co.za/files/Cms/General/d/1879/aae663e2216842748177e84be976ac05.jpg

Sihle Dlamini as (Lucky) and Jayashree Basavaraj as Padma in Avie Luthra’s Lucky (2012). Image source: http://cdn.24.co.za/files/Cms/General/d/1879/aae663e2216842748177e84be976ac05.jpg

AN emotional tour de force, Lucky (2012) shines a torch within our darkened hearts to lobby for our compassion for children who falls through the cracks of our flawed social fabric. The journey that Lucky Ntlantla (Sihle Dlamini) undertakes to find his father following his mother’s sad passing walks us through an exploration of those very cracks. He is alone. This film reminds us just how easy it is for the world to swallow a child in the face of no family support network. Its ambiguous ending does not remedy or allay our concern for the boy, it acerbate the terrifying grip.

Avie Luthra’s Lucky lashes out a hard wake up snot klap of 4dEF’Points out of Five: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ /

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17 March

 

© Mmutle Arthur Kgokong 2015

mmutleak@gmail.com

follow @mmutleak

Film Review: For Love And Broken Bones

Lerato Mvelase (as Refilwe) and Mduduzi Mabaso (as Motheo) in For Love and Broken Bones. Image source: http://cdn.dstv.com/mms.dstv.com/Content/Images/DStv/Mzansi/Promo/mz_promo_for_love_and_broken_bones.jpg

Lerato Mvelase (as Refilwe) and Mduduzi Mabaso (as Motheo) in For Love And Broken Bones. Image source: http://cdn.dstv.com/mms.dstv.com/Content/Images/DStv/Mzansi/Promo/mz_promo_for_love_and_broken_bones.jpg

IN the face of modernity any society that sees opulence in abundance is bound to have victims that fall prey to a misunderstanding that opulence is the birthright of everyone. From the urban centers of our globe to the hinter yards of our miserable townships both the immigrant, rural or foreign, and the city slicker fall victim to this perception. On the other hand the inevitable movement towards the city robs those dear to the immigrant of a precious time. It is bound to leave their family bitter. Throw abuse into the quack mire of the migrant sojourner’s time at home during the holidays you’ve got a family whose scars runs deep. And somewhere in the shadows of this played out theatre an unscrupulous puppeteer gingerly, a mashonisa (creditor) to be clear, jolts the situation to their favor to rake out some money here and there with unreasonable interest.

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dEF’Rating: For Love and Broken Bones

Lerato Mvelase (as Refilwe) and Mduduzi Mabaso (as Motheo) in For Love and Broken Bones. Image source: http://cdn.dstv.com/mms.dstv.com/Content/Images/DStv/Mzansi/Promo/mz_promo_for_love_and_broken_bones.jpg

Lerato Mvelase (as Refilwe) and Mduduzi Mabaso (as Motheo) in For Love And Broken Bones. Image source: http://cdn.dstv.com/mms.dstv.com/Content/Images/DStv/Mzansi/Promo/mz_promo_for_love_and_broken_bones.jpg

While this is a tragic story, which even the undiscerning viewer will learn to accept as soon the credits roll up and the debate is won between that mug of steaming coffee or a nightly snack. It is not debatable that we’ve seen this film before. The film’s context is its ace. It does offer a delightful setting by way of location though. The acting, which is dotted by actors associated with the Bomb Shelter, is of the finest quality. The cinematography is clean and experimentally in the league of its own. Mduduzi Mabaso is believable as a troubled hero. Lerato Mvelase holds her ground as a staunch woman making ends meet to raise her child in a loving home. …yes you are right to assume that the protagonist is telling the story from the great beyond.

For Love And Broken Bones throws a mild 3dEF’Points out of Five: ♦ ♦ ♦ //

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09 March

 

© Mmutle Arthur Kgokong 2015

mmutleak@gmail.com    

follow @mmutleak

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 5

THE latest installment of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (TMNT) colourfully busts out of the darkened sewers as the ninja’s are drawn out into the big wide world with a racy action packed flow that will hold the attention of diehard fans of this franchise for an unoriginal battle with their arch nemesis Shredder and his minions. Thanks to CGI tech when the present pumped up martial art weapon wielding versions of the favorite reptiles and humans interact on screen there is a little difference that gives way that you are actually not watching real turtles.

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Regime

 /ray-zheem/ 

“A system”

 

The idea of a regime is tightly knitted with state control. Whatever it is that might’ve ushered in a regime has its basis in a reactionary ousting of the power block before it. We see in our history of states evolution from monarch to feudal, from repression to democratic struggles. Even within the democratic state, lauded as highest expression of social evolution we see struggles, here and there, for more emancipation henceforth discontent expressed through mobilised mass actions to jolt a state into reality. 

Regimes, we might as well advance to call it state controllers, has the advantage of remaining at the helm of power far longer than the opposition can keep up with it. Besides it can use tactics to usurp counter ideologies to that of its own. Access to state resources is an added benefit to its arsenal of defence in order that it stands its ground. Henceforth during any regimes campaign to continuously occupy the centre of power the effort to remain is like a walk in the park.

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