Itshitshi

Itshitshi is a brave interrogation of muti killings in our society. Above all else it is also a reflection on the nature of greed prevalent in us with regards to being successful as a people at any cost, let alone running businesses. It is an exquisitely made film with a balanced palette for its production design that does justice to the script it rests on. Nhlakanipho Mapumulo will win your heart as an animatedly soft empathetic Njomane and both Dawn Thandeka King and Nomsa Bthelezi respectively hold their positions as great talent this country has ever ushered to our screens. Yes you guessed it right I loved this film

Τhere are works of art that braves to tackle contemporary issues with verve and hold water while doing so and there are those that do exactly that within the confines of a small canvas scale, as far as cinematographic time accorded them is concerned, and manage to just get it perfect, leaving no loose ends and nuancing the demise or triumphs of the human spirit for us to think about. Thapelo Motloung’s Itshitshi (2017) fits snugly into the second paradigm

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Plight of a little man

Today all genders are equal however it is the foundation upon which each gender/identity(s), if you will, is nurtured that is of primary importance otherwise the picture will continue to ferment with cold violence. It starts with attaching value to boys and girls equally when they make their entry into this world. By attaching value to men and women equally without neglecting either one of them continuously. It starts here. Notice that I am not bitterly neglecting anyone behind.

optical jacket1»» The warning signals of the neglect of our boys has never been whistle clear as it is today. It is easy to blame someone but all this cold violence against women that we are witnessing begs a simple question. How do we raise our boys in comparison to girls? Have we evolved what it means to be a man in our contemporary society the same way we have evolved the idea of a woman as an identity and are continuing to do so in our effort to socially redress the role of women and parity thereof? No. Boys are neglected and are expected to grow into men who will love and protect our sisters, daughters and mothers as well as brother and fathers ««

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Hindsight: A good story to tell, a promise to take up arms and nothing to offer

The problem of the blues, the Democratic Alliance, is that while their ideology of equal opportunity for all and abolishment of cronyism is sound they cannot wish away the fact that in order to have an outright win of the black hearts and minds and eventually, votes come 3 August, they will have to be committed to the cause of continuing to lift black people out of poverty.

optical jacket1When Julius Malema during his Aljazeera interview made a call to take up arms should the 2016 local elections be rigged as he and the reds believe the 2014 election in which his party deputed nation wide were rigged he did two things on an international platform. Whether wittingly or unwittingly we will find out one day, however on the one hand ahead of the reds, Economic Freedom Fighters, local election manifesto launch he called attention to his political party so that the media’s attention could on 30 April train its sights on him which will give him the publicity he needs and on the other hand he let his guard off and revealed the true nature of the kind of a leader he is or the kind of a political party he presides over. He has, as the epitome of the reds, reminded us that he is not prepared to work and carve out a future for this country as a moderate and crowd pleaser within the realm of multiracialism. Suddenly the cool cat that we saw during the campaign to impeach the president at the stoop of parliament was gone. Malema stands for the dispossessed, the black populace, to be specific – the youth – the young people who constitute the constituency let down by the occupants of the center of power

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Diary entry 24 April 2016

optical jacket1Many thanks to those of you who continue to support our facebook page and blog http://www.mmutleak.com. There are a couple of works in the pipeline for Intraparadox series so do stay linked and synced we will be posting soon. These upcoming works are interviews with artists. As it is tradition they are long, averaging around 40 to 60 minutes. Yes we know, who has the time to read lengthy stuff, right?

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Dye My Memories

Say ''Peace''. Hair dye on canvas.2016
Seboko, Thato. Say Peace, 2016. Hair Dye on canvas. Dimensions not available

I spoke to Thato Seboko on Tuesday 12 April ahead of his solo exhibition opening at the Mellow House Factory in Tshwane, Hatfield. The artist was excited about his upcoming exhibition which will feature a new body of work comprising of 16 artworks. Presently he is working with a new media – hair dye, which is a non traditional art making material and can be looked upon as a new vehicle for artistic expression and thematic enunciation as far as new media is concerned. Since the artist retains a figurative approach in dealing with his subject matter something of fine art tradition is retained with regard to form but the accepted media of delivery is challenged and thus the boundary of art production process pushed further.

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Hindsight: Of Big Bosses and Minions

 

HISTORYAs South African political parties diverge in different directions this weekend across our country to launch their political manifestoes sandwiched with promises and posturing ahead of the oncoming local government elections on  3 August 2016 an uneasiness pervades the employees of the City of Tshwane and their families who have been renting apartments and houses from the municipality.

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Interview with Mxolisi Vusimuzi Beauchamp (Part III)

Interview with Mxolisi Vusimuzi Beauchamp (Part III)

Location: Pretoria Art Museum, Tshwane, South Africa

Date: Tuesday 17 February 2015 at 09:00

Part Three:

Identity /Ideology Bamboozled

 

Mmutle. So would you say the idea of identity in terms of the content of the work started to take shape somewhere during this period, as you were exposed to the work of Spike Lee in comparison to the work of John Singleton?

Vusi. There was another artist, an English-Nigerian who used Elephant dung in his artworks. I forget his name. But like in identity, interrogating the idea of identity you know in the arts Spike Lee’s ‘Bamboozled’ sort of put at rest my anger towards the way blacks were excluded. You know that movie it made sense in a way that entertainment and such things were not something that was reserved for black people in a way. Entertainment wise it was mocking them. That was the entertainment industry and I just wanted to find a way for escaping or teaching [myself] or finding a way to express my anger through specifying that there is a difference between an artist and a black artist. They are two different things.

Mmutle. You mean the difference between a white artist…?

Vusi. No-no, the difference between an artist and a black artist. You know if you are black you are not an artist you are a ‘black artist’. So there is that thing…

[Mmutle. So you are not an artist pure – you are a black artist.]

Vusi. That’s what helped me to interrogate this thing. I have always saw myself as an artist…

Mmutle. And now this dichotomy of

Beauchamp, Mxolisi Vusimuzi. New Industry, 2015. Mixed Media.
Beauchamp, Mxolisi Vusimuzi. New Industry, 2015. Mixed Media.

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