Intraparadox: Interview with Nthabiseng Rachel Montshiwa (Audio Version)

This interview was commissioned by Refilwe Art Reach Project as part of an up coming planned publication of the work that Mme Nthabiseng Rachel Montshiwa is doing in the Free State.

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Intraparadox: Interview with Elizabeth Balcomb

Tradition, absolutely I think that’s happening on a global level from what I can see when I look at the Venice Biennial – pieces that were there, I am excited by the fact that art moves and goes into new directions and I think it is great and South Africa, and so called African Art is huge in the world out there at the moment right now and it’s a great opportunity for us to go for it galleries are just waiting for good art to come out of Africa and it’ll be great if there was support in the South Africa of the arts, I don’t think, jeepers, enough is done around that theme. Artists needs support. I just feel that there is so much talent in South Africa and talent is not flipping race orientated you get born into it and I just [think] that hey the possibilities for studying art and entering competitions is all happening and we hear endless talk about job creation there is flipping job creation right there with people with their talents and artists start employing people to start helping them with their work' Elizabeth Balcomb

Interview with Senzo Njabulo Shabangu (Part Two): Towards a Concrete Concept

Senzo. I met good artists at the classes offered by the Johannesburg Art Gallery, one guy Blessing Ngubeni I also met him there. He works here now. So we were kept busy drawing each other, doing portraits. I enjoyed it very much... Mmutle. This is in 2006 Senzo. Yes, it was nice because I did not know… I never went to a place where they could offer a free art lesson, also free art material. I mean I just went there without anything so they gave us pencils and whatnot, we were seating and just drawing. Hanging around a group of artists it was also …blood to me, I felt like, very very good. For the first time in Jo’burg I was making friends and I was around people I could relate to. Sometimes we would seat and do portraits. I don’t know if I can jump to that place but what happened I found out now about those art classes they used to call them Taxi Art Classes. But back then I did not know that those art classes were funded by David Krut. Mmutle. So you only learnt about this later…? Senzo. I found out maybe two years ago or so. I was just chatting to David about that period of my life and he said ‘I was actually the one who funded the materials’

Interview with Senzo Njabulo Shabangu (Part One): Today, Tomorrow, Everyday

Mmutle. What was your experience of the, of the first solo exhibition that you had …and when was it? Senzo. My first solo exhibition I called it I ‘Naked Pressure’ it was in 2010 if I am not mistaken, because I met David Krut, no 2011, I met David Krut uhm, uhm after I won the David Koloane Award in 2010. Trhough the award I acquired a working space here at the Bag Factory for three months. I was working with three international artists, one from Holland and one from Germany. For the first time uBaba koloane, I call him Doctor Koloane, Pat Mautloa, these people were here, they were around me and they were mentoring me, being there molding me. In the morning before we worked they will have coffee with me and they will talk to me. They gave me the opportunity to explore what I wanted to explore.