Intraparadox Interview With Taiwo Olugbemega Ohu

» On the 23 of May 2016 I sat down with Taiwo Ohu against the background of his exhibition at the Pretoria Art Museum at that time. He spoke to me about his training, the challenges that face in the crises of lack of traditional art making material and his then upcoming exhibition which was …

Continue reading Intraparadox Interview With Taiwo Olugbemega Ohu

Advertisements

Interview with Senzo Njabulo Shabangu (Part Two): Towards a Concrete Concept

Senzo. I met good artists at the classes offered by the Johannesburg Art Gallery, one guy Blessing Ngubeni I also met him there. He works here now. So we were kept busy drawing each other, doing portraits. I enjoyed it very much... Mmutle. This is in 2006 Senzo. Yes, it was nice because I did not know… I never went to a place where they could offer a free art lesson, also free art material. I mean I just went there without anything so they gave us pencils and whatnot, we were seating and just drawing. Hanging around a group of artists it was also …blood to me, I felt like, very very good. For the first time in Jo’burg I was making friends and I was around people I could relate to. Sometimes we would seat and do portraits. I don’t know if I can jump to that place but what happened I found out now about those art classes they used to call them Taxi Art Classes. But back then I did not know that those art classes were funded by David Krut. Mmutle. So you only learnt about this later…? Senzo. I found out maybe two years ago or so. I was just chatting to David about that period of my life and he said ‘I was actually the one who funded the materials’

Interview with Senzo Njabulo Shabangu (Part One): Today, Tomorrow, Everyday

Mmutle. What was your experience of the, of the first solo exhibition that you had …and when was it? Senzo. My first solo exhibition I called it I ‘Naked Pressure’ it was in 2010 if I am not mistaken, because I met David Krut, no 2011, I met David Krut uhm, uhm after I won the David Koloane Award in 2010. Trhough the award I acquired a working space here at the Bag Factory for three months. I was working with three international artists, one from Holland and one from Germany. For the first time uBaba koloane, I call him Doctor Koloane, Pat Mautloa, these people were here, they were around me and they were mentoring me, being there molding me. In the morning before we worked they will have coffee with me and they will talk to me. They gave me the opportunity to explore what I wanted to explore.

Tshepo Mosopa’s Seemo Sa Boraro (Third Class)

The artist has hinted on one fact concerning the use of public transport with regard to the train ‘That the commuters lose their identity once they are inside the train coach especially those traveling third class. They are subjected to pick pocketing and clothes ruffling as if insignificant, meanwhile they are the power tools, the lifeline of the City’ ‘That the commuters lose their identity once they inside the train coach especially those traveling third class. They are subjected to pick pocketing and clothes ruffling as if insignificant’