Itshitshi

Τhere are works of art that braves to tackle contemporary issues with verve and hold water while doing so and there are those that do exactly that within the confines of a small canvas scale, as far as cinematographic time accorded them is concerned, and manage to just get it perfect, leaving no loose ends and nuancing the demise or triumphs of the human spirit for us to think about. Thapelo Motloung’s Itshitshi (2017) fits snugly into the second paradigm

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Film Review: Elinye Ithuba

♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  /  –

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Τhere is a moment in Elinye Ithuba wherein Dumisani (Blondie Makhene) and Hlengiwe (Slindile Nodangala)are reminiscing about the past and laments the time that Dumisani missed while he was in jail and music is playing in the background. Jovially he asks her who is the musician playing this good music and Hlengiwe responds that it is Blondie, surprisingly Dumisani exclaims that who would’ve thought that Blondie would still be singing after all these years

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Film Review: The Ring

image source: http://rndcdn.dstv.com/dstvcms/2015/12/08/ring.jpg
image source: http://rndcdn.dstv.com/dstvcms/2015/12/08/ring.jpg

There are works that simply repeat what we have seen before by just changing the context within which their narratives are rooted and then push the narratives towards us. One, supposedly a discerning viewer, can forgive such narratives for their repetitive swing if they are adorned with strong points in their construction. If the work is revisionist in its take of the subject matter concerned then the discerning viewer is in for a treat. If there is a lack in this regard but the work makes up for it in its actors performances or its production design which may represent a strong center point in the delivery of the narrative, the viewer – discerning or lay, may be forgiving as far as the failure of the work to advance story telling is concerned. The Ring, which falls in the latter spectrum is rescued by an ensemble of its actors as it tries to impress

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Film Review: Ilizwi

♦  ♦  ♦  / – –

Ilizwi
Image Source:  https://pbs.twing.com/media/CVxVrIZU8AAoQqY.png

The story of paranormal activity with a twist of traditional African beliefs has been told before. In any case it would seem quite weird but not impossible for a protagonist to be inserted in a story set in South Africa wherein they are mysteriously blessed with telepathic prowess without attributing their power to some ancestral lineage. Imagine if there was such a film? Contextually speaking the creatives involved will have to push the imaginary envelope where no one has gone before. That place does exist. It is outside of the box

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Film Review: The Haunted Wardrobe!

(♦♦♦−−)

{HERE} are moments in this film where the viewer may be jolted out of their stupor if not a comfortable couch. This is a paranormal outing and the film has a few surprises up its sleeve. What are the chances of two studs ending up sharing a house with a gorgeous roommate when they need a third tenant to split the rent with? Unfortunately a hideous wardrobe will see to it that there is no peace and harmony in the ‘big house’. You can think of the wardrobe as a fourth tenant because besides it being at the center of the story it is a catalyst that leads to catastrophic events as the motion picture narrative unfolds.

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Film Review: Kwaito or Nothing

(♦♦♦−−)

{I} could not help it but think of Zulu Boy while watching this flick. Menzi Biyela cuts his teeth deeper into a fully fledged film. Unlike the Capfin advertisements he is synonymous known for here his acting talent surfaces. He stars as Mondli the taxi driver from Umlazi. He is brought to Gauteng by Baba Tshabalala a.k.a Mshengo (Emmanuel Nkosi) to work for him in the city with the last of his taxi’s

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Film Review: My Brother’s Keeper

Nomelezi V. Ntshimba as Tshepo and Miranda Mokhele as Dimakatso in Lehlohonolo ‘Shaft’ Moropane's My Brother's Keeper (2014)
Nomelezi V. Ntshimba as Tshepo and Miranda Mokhele Ntshangase as Dimakatso in Lehlohonolo ‘Shaft’ Moropane’s My Brother’s Keeper (2014)

{If} you are going to make a film about a narrative whose juice has been exhaustively squeezed to the point of dry bone snap you will be a miracle worker to find anything new to say. Lehlohonolo ‘Shaft’ Moropane’s My Brother’s Keeper (2014) is one such a film. It’s a love tragedy. Is there anything that anyone can do with this theme? This is an attempt. I invite you to be the judge

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