EarVasion – SAKHILE MOLESHE: The Final Call

SAKHILE MOLESHE: The Final Call

Released: December 21, 2018

label: Imilozi Music

Number of tracks: 15

Length: 1:09:12

Here is an album that challenges monotonous conventions while proving that an album does not have to be one thing; it can be many things held together by artistic innovation and creativity.

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Itshitshi

Τhere are works of art that braves to tackle contemporary issues with verve and hold water while doing so and there are those that do exactly that within the confines of a small canvas scale, as far as cinematographic time accorded them is concerned, and manage to just get it perfect, leaving no loose ends and nuancing the demise or triumphs of the human spirit for us to think about. Thapelo Motloung’s Itshitshi (2017) fits snugly into the second paradigm

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The Imposter

»The consoling thing about Ferguson’s new drama series The Imposter is that the actor producer couple is not appearing in the series. Unless if a cameo appearance is planned down the line of the series airings. It would be great if the present status quo is kept as it is so that we can enjoy their craft from behind the scenes as they erect a stage for other talent to flex their muscles in the burgeoning South African television coliseum

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The (Re)discovery of Sonequa Martin-Green

Sonequa Martin-Green sad exit from the #TheWalkingDead as Sasha Williams to be casted as Lieutenant Commander Michael Burnham in Star Trek: Discovery proves that when one door closes another one opens and sometime that door is filled with better opportunities. She holds her ground as number one to Michelle Yeoh cast as Philippa Georgiou Captain of the USS Shenzhou as the new narrative opens for the new Star Trek. Martin-Green’s convincing performance leaves no traces of Sasha Williams and she looks like she might just take the devoted trekkies where they have always wanted to go …beyond imagination (which can be translated as ‘to boldly go when no one has gone before’).

#MyRating > 3dEFPoints/5 (for now based on the first episode which proposes a myriad of possibilities for a new story)


Image source: https://www.dailydot.com/parsec/star-trek-discovery-cast-timeline-trailer/

© mmutleak 2017

EarVasion – TLALE MAKHENE: Swazigold

» Tlale Makhene’s new album has hit the sound sphere. I had a chance of listening to it. Verdict? lets just say I was transported…

  1. Ntfonjeni

Outlines the musicianship that will take you through this offering.

  1. Labantfu

Piano leads, Makhene’s percussion is pervasive as the melodious chorus of Max Hoba builds. Nathi Shongwe’s Keys raises the curtains.  Wait for the guitar of Erik Paliani to chip in and the Tenor Saxophone of Ayo Solanke to exchange with it and what you’ve got is a promise of things to come in Swazigold.

  1. Mahamba To Chilomoni

This track settles us within the album. Sabu Satsha is audible at the opening supporting the lyrics. But as the song takes it second turn Nathi Shongwe reintroduce the medoc vocals led by Max Hoba. Makhene is there entranced and on fire as one of the female vocalist goes into a Busi Mhlongo mode.

  1. Lelive

This is a horn base track thanks to the antics of Ayo Solanke on Tenor and Soprano Saxophone. With Max Hoba leading the meditative vocals. Makhene percussion and Satsha’s drums interjects periodically.

  1. Mswati

Shongwe and the vocalists pays homage to the King with Makhene creating a background canvas upon which all is invited to play.  Ayo Solanke’s horn chips in further down this track. Not aggressively so as not to upset this balanced orchestra.

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Film Review: Elinye Ithuba

♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  /  –

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Τhere is a moment in Elinye Ithuba wherein Dumisani (Blondie Makhene) and Hlengiwe (Slindile Nodangala)are reminiscing about the past and laments the time that Dumisani missed while he was in jail and music is playing in the background. Jovially he asks her who is the musician playing this good music and Hlengiwe responds that it is Blondie, surprisingly Dumisani exclaims that who would’ve thought that Blondie would still be singing after all these years

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Film Review: The Ring

There are works that simply repeat what we have seen before by just changing the context within which their narratives are rooted and then push the narratives towards us. One, supposedly a discerning viewer, can forgive such narratives for their repetitive swing if they are adorned with strong points in their construction. If the work is revisionist in its take of the subject matter concerned then the discerning viewer is in for a treat. If there is a lack in this regard but the work makes up for it in its actors performances or its production design which may represent a strong center point in the delivery of the narrative, the viewer – discerning or lay, may be forgiving as far as the failure of the work to advance story telling is concerned. The Ring, which falls in the latter spectrum is rescued by an ensemble of its actors as it tries to impress

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Film Review: Ilizwi

♦  ♦  ♦  / – –

The story of paranormal activity with a twist of traditional African beliefs has been told before. In any case it would seem quite weird but not impossible for a protagonist to be inserted in a story set in South Africa wherein they are mysteriously blessed with telepathic prowess without attributing their power to some ancestral lineage. Imagine if there was such a film? Contextually speaking the creatives involved will have to push the imaginary envelope where no one has gone before. That place does exist. It is outside of the box

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Film Review: Sugar & Spice

(♦♦♦−−)

{f} there is anything that can disappoint one with films is when a film ends and you as the viewer feel it did not give its all, when it feels short or even hurried. When you feel there are a lot of knots left undone. A sort of uncrossed t’s that begs crossing. If a film is minimal as a work of art it should established such an idea right at the opening scenes. Its detail to economy will demand that it is judged on that merit. However even such work will wrestle with its closing final scenes if it is to be accomplished by way of its consistency in order for us to regard it as a finished piece albeit minimal. Sugar & Spice leaves us with a bitter sweet taste because it fails to round of its rich discourse, instead, it erects questions right about the end of its crux narrative and that is its only flaw.

Mzansi Bioskop

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